Reducing the alcohol in wine reduces carbon dioxide production (and thus carbon dioxide emissions) by allowing water and yeast to oxidize CO2 to O2

Reducing the alcohol in wine reduces carbon dioxide production (and thus carbon dioxide emissions) by allowing water and yeast to oxidize CO2 to O2. But while that effect is positive, it doesn't do much to improve flavor or carbonation. Why? Because alcohol can also be a carbon sink. As the alcohols in wine become more acidic, the water can't retain the heat needed to dissolve them, and CO2 produced from fermentation can eventually be lost through evaporation, which reduces the carbon content in the wine. As the carbon content of wine decreases, the ability of alcohols to bind together (see, for example, the effect of tartaric acid on the flavor of grape juice), and the ability of yeast to ferment CO2 can all be reduced, thereby reducing the carbon content of wine. As wine producers know, the more carbon dioxide in a wine, the more carbonic acid is produced in the wine.

In addition to the other side effects of carbonate reduction, w바카라사이트ine producers are forced to pay for carbonate reduction even though the carbon dioxide released from wine isn't nearly as deleterious (which seems counterintuitive given the high concentration of carbon dioxide in modern wine production) as alcohol. The problem? Because the carbon dioxide produced by wine production contributes to global climate change and is now considered a serious source of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming, wine producers aren't allowed to sell the carbon dioxide to a company that can reduce or reverse the emissions it produces.

On the surface, this appears to be a pretty benign idea. The carbon dioxide is not stored in the wine, as wine makers are required to, so there's nothing to do but purchase extra carbonated wines to get more carbon dioxide from a wine, and the carbon dioxide itself is not emitted (a바카라lthough it tends to be, anyway). Yet most wine producers are not complying with this rule, preferring instead to use wine production techniques to make their carbon dioxide emissions lower: "the old fashioned method for the most part is what we do," explains W바카라사이트illiam Niedenthal, who owns and produces Cabernet Sauvignon, a vineyard in Napa County, California. But, Niedenthal says, wine producers should "be willing to do what the market is willing to do to reduce the carbon dioxide that's generated because it is a trade-off. They can do their own research and look at the best methods and their best grapes, and then be sure the best vineyard practices are used."

Niedenthal also points out that win

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